Two kangaroos and a bird of prey in the Australian outback.

Animals Australia joins the International Kangaroo Protection Alliance.

For a kinder future for kangaroos.
Animals Australia

Animals Australia team

Last updated 7 March 2022

Animals Australia is proud to join this international group of wildlife advocates on behalf of our members, to help shape a future where kangaroos are respected and protected.

The International Kangaroo Protection Alliance (IKPA) is an alliance of organisations and experts committed to raising awareness of the plight of kangaroos to people across Australia and the globe. 

Not only do kangaroos hold a crucial role in healthy Australian ecosystems, but they also have intrinsic value, and think, feel and experience just like the companion animals we share our homes with. 

Together, Animals Australia, our members, and all the dedicated advocates in the IKPA are working to ensure kangaroos and people can coexist, thrive, and share the land we call home. 

Why do kangaroos need protection? 

Despite being adored by people the world over, Australia’s federal and state governments allow ‘protected’ kangaroos to be shot, injured and killed each night across the country 

This government-sanctioned killing of an Australian icon is happening at the very same time Australia’s native animal populations are suffering from the impacts of habitat destruction. With swathes of land being cleared (largely to graze more cattle for beef and dairy) and catastrophic weather events like the Black Summer bushfires, their homes and food sources are diminishing. 

It comes as a surprise to most that the laws in place to protect kangaroos can be lifted with government exemptions, allowing them to be shot. The Federal and State Governments give these exemptions for the commercial sale of meat and skin to domestic and international markets, and through state-based kill permits on request from land managers with generally very few requirements to seek alternative ways to co-exist with native wildlife.

In 2016, 1.34 million kangaroos were killed for the commercial industry. Some kangaroo meat is used for pet food, some for human consumption, and kangaroo skin (leather) is widely used in the manufacture of sporting shoes, gloves, dress shoes, and accessories.

Due to the often remote locations where kangaroo shooting occurs as well as the fact that it occurs mostly at night, there is no effective monitoring of animal welfare in place. When mothers are shot, the fate of orphaned joeys who are too small to be of any ‘commercial value’ to hunters is grim. Depending on their size, they can legally be decapitated or bludgeoned to death. If they escape, they are at risk of falling victim to predators, exposure to the elements or starvation. 

The shocking reality of kangaroo shooting was recently aired in a confronting ABC 7.30 report

This image contains content which some may find confronting

Kangaroo joey hanging out of mother's pouch, ears perked up and feet sticking out over their head.

If kangaroos continue to be killed at the current rate allowed by the Australian Government, there is a chance that Australia faces a future where this beloved native animal is nothing but a memory. 

How you can help kangaroos 

  • JOIN THE UPCOMING GLOBAL NIKE PROTEST FOR KANGAROOS.Take a stand for kangaroos and participate in the global day of protest against Nike’s use of kangaroos as ‘high-end’ soccer boots on 12 March 2022. Calling on Nike to stop funding the kangaroo massacre, the peaceful protests will be held in 7 cities worldwide; Sydney, Melbourne, and Brisbane in Australia. You can also join in digitally by sharing information on your social media and using the hashtags listed on the event page here. 
  • Don’t buy into cruelty – for you or your pet. Instead of buying kangaroo meat or skin, choose animal-friendly foods and products. You can also urge restaurants, supermarkets, and stores in your area to remove any kangaroo products.

This image contains content which some may find confronting

Three kangaroos standing in long grass, in height order, tallest to smallest, all looking at the camera.

Gift a donation this Christmas

Help protect animals on behalf of a loved one this festive season

Give now